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Archive for the ‘Health Tips’ Category

The Best Way to Clean Dentures

Jun 17th, 2018

Having dentures presents a distinct set of challenges. Everything from getting used to the fit in your mouth, to the way it feels when you chew, to care and upkeep can feel foreign. We put together some tips and tricks on proper daily cleaning of your dentures, plus advice on keeping them pearly white!

How to Clean Your Dentures

How to Whiten Yellowing/Brown Dentures

It’s important to remember that the color your dentures are when they’re brand new is the whitest they can be. Because dentures are made of synthetic material, they can’t be whitened in quite the same way natural teeth can be. However, there are things you can do to help your dentures maintain their color.

These simple tips to follow will help denture-wearers keep their dentures clean and keep their mouth healthy. If you have additional questions on dentures or how to care for them, the best thing you can do is contact your dentist!

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Solutions for Tooth Sensitivity

Jun 12th, 2018

Are you experiencing an unusual amount of tooth pain? You could be experiencing heightened sensitivity. Whether it’s a chilly bite of ice cream hitting your enamel, or a piece of chewy or hard candy affecting some previous bacterial buildup, you’re probably most likely to notice tooth sensitivity when you eat and drink. Ouch!

So, what exactly is tooth sensitivity, anyway? Each and every one of our teeth is, to put it simply, enamel-covered tissue. When that enamel breaks down, or is affected by erosion, the sensitive tissue has less protection, causing you to have more of a reaction in your mouth to temperatures and textures.

Luckily, there are some techniques that can help lessen the pain!


If these experiences are affecting you seriously, talk to your dentist. There are special toothpastes that can help with the pain, and fluoride treatments available in office and to take home. Sensitive teeth can affect our moods and smile if extremely painful, so if you are experiencing such hardships, reach out to your dentist to get back on the right track to less painful teeth!

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4 Tips to Help you Choose the Right Dentist

Jun 5th, 2018

Websites such as Amazon and Expedia.com have trained us to be price analysts in our search for the perfect product. We expect to be able to use filters to instantly find the most bang for our buck – a process that works for purchasing shoes, air travel, electronics, even food items. Yet when it comes to choosing your dentist, the decision shouldn’t be based on price alone since such a decision can cost you more in the long run.

What information is available to us? Next to a dentist’s smiling photo on a website, there is often a stream of acronyms, initials, and terms that make us run to our dictionary apps for help. Most of us have not been trained in the art of deciphering what various dental degrees, certifications, honors, and memberships actually mean. Just knowing that the doctor went through years of arduous schooling may seem to be sufficient qualification to be up for the job.

So educate yourself. You are not shopping for a one-size-fits-all procedure that you can stick on like a Band-Aid. You are investing in your personal health, esthetics, and physical functionality. Look for a dentist who:

  1. Pursues further training – A dentist who demonstrates a desire to continue learning and bettering his or her skill will have greater proficiency in administering your treatment. For example, board certification is a voluntary pursuit that examines a dentist according to national standards.
  2. Invests in the latest technology – Dentists that invest money in purchasing the latest equipment and time in being trained in it will be able to provide you with more options for your treatment. Only a select few dentists use Suresmile digital technology, for example, which can show you an accurate simulation of how your teeth will look after treatment.
  3. Has a vision – Your procedure should not be taken out of a textbook and handled on autopilot. Your ideal dentist has a smile design philosophy, and crafts a plan customized to your needs. Ask for photos and outcomes from similar cases to see the philosophy in action.
  4. Connects with your vision – Your input is valuable – don’t let any dental personnel intimidate you into silence if you don’t know the right terminology or procedural information! Your dentist’s manner should encourage you to participate fully in making decisions, and as you educate yourself on how to choose the right doctor, you will be empowered to take ownership of the process and results.

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Eating Disorders and Dentistry

May 22nd, 2018

Eating disorders are a serious problem in today’s society. More than 10 million Americans currently suffer from serious eating disorders such as bulimia, anorexia, and binge eating. These eating disorders take a serious toll on your body as well as on your teeth.

People who suffer from anorexia starve themselves in order to attain the weight that they desire. By starving themselves they are not getting the appropriate amount of nutrients from their diet. A lack of important nutrients such as calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin C cause teeth to become weak. Without these important nutrients, oral health and overall health suffer.

Sufferers of bulimia will binge eat and then make themselves vomit in order to reverse the effects of the food that they ate. While this method is extremely harmful to your overall health, it poses a serious threat to your teeth. The acid from your stomach is exposed to your teeth when vomiting regularly. This acid wears away at enamel and causes decay.

People who have eating disorders are at risk of having worn, thin, and translucent teeth. Seeing a professional is your best option in fighting an eating disorder, but often times your dentist can see the signs and help you get help.

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Don’t Fall Asleep With Your Dentures In!

May 15th, 2018

Having dentures can be challenging, especially at first. Many patients have issues adjusting to the size, shape, and orientation of dentures. It may take awhile for patients to become accustomed to having dentures as well as the cleaning and care routine for dentures. Whether you are new to dentures or a seasoned pro, you must know this important fact about them.

Falling asleep with your dentures in puts the elderly at a greatly increased risk for pneumonia. Whether you are a denture-wearer yourself or a caretaker for your elderly mother or grandmother, then you must be aware of the risks. Dental professionals usually recommend that people take out their dentures when they go to bed and use that time to clean them. But, in one study, they found that denture wearers who left their dentures in overnight doubled their risk of getting pneumonia.

The science behind this is that the bacteria and microorganisms that grow on your dentures while you sleep can cause inflammation in your mouth and other parts of your body. While dentures can help restore a lost smile and give back the function to eat and maintain a normal lifestyle, they come with risks too. Speak to your dentist about the best practices of cleaning and taking of your dentures for optimal oral and overall health.

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The Reason Why Oral Piercings Are Bad For Your Teeth

May 8th, 2018

Oral piercings are a popular form of self-expression and for some serve as a stylish accessory to their appearance. Even though an oral piercing might look cute, it could be seriously harming your oral health.

The mouth is teeming with bacteria. Oral piercings are prone to infection and inflammation, and the bacteria in the mouth can cause even more serious infections. Here are some of the oral health risks that you face by choosing an oral piercing.

Infection, pain and swelling

A tongue or uvula piercing could cause so much swelling that it blocks your airway. The bacteria in your mouth could easily cause an infection and could become life threatening if not treated. If you suspect an infection, or experience swelling, pain, fever, or chills, visit your dentist or physician immediately.

Damage to gums, teeth and fillings

It is common for people with oral piercings to play with them. Biting or flicking your piercing against your teeth can injure your teeth and gums. You could damage a filling or crack a tooth while playing on or biting your piercing. Try to avoid playing with or biting the jewelry to protect your teeth.

Nerve Damage

After you get a tongue piercing you may experience numbness in your tongue. Usually the numbness is temporary, but can sometimes be permanent. The injured nerve in your tongue could affect your taste or tongue movement.

There are other factors to take into account such as increased saliva production, choking hazard, and difficulty during dental appointments. Check in with your dentist regularly to make sure that the jewelry in your mouth isn’t causing any serious problems with your oral health.

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Is There a Link Between Cancer and Poor Oral Health?

Apr 24th, 2018

If you suffer from swollen gums, missing teeth, or other poor oral health symptoms, then you may be at a higher risk of contracting human papillomavirus. Known as HPV, the human papillomavirus is a sexually transmitted disease that results in cancers of the cervix, mouth, and throat.

If you have poor oral hygiene, you are at a higher risk of contracting this disease orally. While there is only a modest association between oral health and the HPV infection, there is still a clear link. Researchers are unsure if “poor oral health causes HPV infection and then would go on to cancer.” What they did find was that even when excluding the number of oral sexual partners the subjects had, that those with poor oral health were 55 percent more likely to have an oral HPV infection.

The science behind this link is that poor oral health allows for sores, inflammation and lesions in your mouth, through which HPV can enter. It is much easier for HPV to enter through these inflamed areas in your mouth and enter the bloodstream. Researchers urge patients not to stress too much. They say that since the association is modest that people should not jump to varying their habits because these studies are in their infancy.

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How to Handle a Dental Emergency

Apr 17th, 2018

Whether it was a car accident, a fall, or some other traumatic mishap that led to you harming your teeth, here is a guide on what to do if you chip, crack, break, dislodge, or lose a tooth.

Oftentimes, traumatic accidents can damage your teeth. When that occurs, a dentist can help fix the problem, but here are a few things you can do if a traumatic oral health injury ever happens to you.

You Chip a Tooth

Maybe you chewed on something too hard, or tripped and fell, whatever the cause, a chipped or broken tooth can hurt and here are a few things you can do in that situation to maximize your chances for restoration.

It might not be possible for the dentist to reattach your tooth, but bring it along anyway just in case they can fix it.

You Dislodge a Tooth

You have somehow managed to partially dislodge your tooth. It hasn’t fallen out yet, but is not securely in your mouth like it should be. Whatever accident you had, follow these steps to get help.

  • Put a cold compress on it to decrease swelling
  • Get to the dentist immediately
  • It is important to get to the dentist as quickly as you can so that they can assess the situation and find the best form of treatment for you.

    You Knock Out a Tooth

    Whether it was a swift punch, or walking into a pole, try your best to find the tooth and salvage it.

    Teeth that are replaced within an hour of an accident have the best chance to be saved. Rush to your dentist help in order to save your tooth.

    Traumatic oral health incidents can be very difficult and painful to go through. Call your dentist for help if you accidentally harm your teeth.

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    Hormones and oral health: The difference between men and women you didn’t know.

    Apr 10th, 2018

    When it comes to oral health, the risks faced by men and women are not the same. Hormonal fluctuations cause women to be uniquely susceptible to gum disease in at least four stages of life. Even when all else remains unchanged, you or a woman you know may be confused by heightened vulnerability to certain conditions.

    Red, swollen gums during puberty, menses, or pregnancy can be one result of hormone fluctuations. As the levels of estrogen and progesterone rise, blood flow to the gums increases and changes the way gums react to plaque. Women may experience bleeding during brushing and flossing, heightened sensitivity, or swelling of the gum tissue. Menstrual gingivitis can develop near the start of your period but also ends just as quickly while pregnancy gingivitis is a real cause of concern for many women any time during their term. Dry mouth can also develop during pregnancy as the composition and volume of saliva produced changes.

    During menopause taste perception and burning sensations in the mouth may occur, which can lead to a host of other problems – eating disorders and self-induced vomiting being a few. Inform the women in your life of their increased susceptibility to certain oral conditions. For ladies, there is a lot on your mind during hormonal transitions, but don’t forget about your oral health!

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    Your Brain on Candy

    Apr 4th, 2018

    While candy is a well-known culprit when it comes to tooth decay and cavities, it is also known as the downfall of many weight loss plans. When times get tough, we seem to always reach for the unhealthy treats, and it turns out that there is a scientific reason for us.

    A study done by scientists at the Laboratory for Social and Neural Systems Research at the University of Zurich found a link between stress and a desire for less healthy foods. Stress can cause teeth grinding but it can also cause us to reach for the cookie jar.

    An increase in cortisol, a hormone linked to stress, makes us more willing to eat junk food than healthful snacks. It also causes us to forget about the long-term repercussions of our choices. When under stress we choose to deal with the immediate need and so our future plans to lose twenty pounds and to have healthy teeth.

    Stress is a major factor in harming your teeth and your overall health. So, next time you get stressed out, go for a stroll and then decide if that piece of chocolate is what you really need or if you just need to relax.

    Source

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    Here at Paul Mathew, D.D.S. we work diligently to protect our patients' privacy. Requesting an appointment via our Internet portal is considered part of what the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) has identified as electronically protected healthcare information or ePHI. Unfortunately, despite our best efforts, there are people or entities that may attempt to intercept the data you transmit to us. By checking the "I agree" box, and electronically making an appointment request, you acknowledge that you are making an appointment over the internet and that Paul Mathew, D.D.S. will keep this information confidential but cannot guarantee that others, outside of our practice, may illegally intercept this communication. By accepting these terms and conditions and sending this request via our Internet portal, you accept the inherent risk(s) associated with making this request for an appointment. If you do not accept the terms and conditions, you are always welcome to contact our office via telephone to schedule your appointment.

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    Here at Paul Mathew, D.D.S. we work diligently to protect our patients' privacy. Requesting an appointment via our Internet portal is considered part of what the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) has identified as electronically protected healthcare information or ePHI. Unfortunately, despite our best efforts, there are people or entities that may attempt to intercept the data you transmit to us. By checking the "I agree" box, and electronically making an appointment request, you acknowledge that you are making an appointment over the internet and that Paul Mathew, D.D.S. will keep this information confidential but cannot guarantee that others, outside of our practice, may illegally intercept this communication. By accepting these terms and conditions and sending this request via our Internet portal, you accept the inherent risk(s) associated with making this request for an appointment. If you do not accept the terms and conditions, you are always welcome to contact our office via telephone to schedule your appointment.

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    The information presented here is not intended or implied to be medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. It should be used for informational purposes only.